Visit to the Pyramids

The Pyramids of Giza, called Al-Ahram – built for the 4th-dynasty (c. 2575–2465 BC) kings Khufu (Greek: Cheops), Khafre (Chephren), and Menkaure (Mykerinus) – are the last survivors of the ancient Seven Wonders of the World.

It is an unbelievable experience to view this masterpiece of architecture while surrounded by the Sahara desert.

Only when you stand next to the Pyramids, you get a real feeling how big they really are and wonder at the effort it took to build them . . . The Great Pyramid, tomb of King Khufu, towers some 455 feet (140 meters) over the desert.

The Pyramids at Giza

Tourists on camels next to the pyramid

The pyramids . . . I think that this is my best shot till date. Shot on the Canon EOS 400D.


Next to the Pyramids, a camel owner and his camel . . .

A camel owner and his snooty camel. Just look at the expression.


The three pyramids – Khufu’s (Cheops), his son Khafre’s and Menkaure’s.
These along with the Sphinx, the funerary temples and the minor pyramids of their queens had completed the entire pyramid complex at Giza or El-Giza.

Pyramids and sky

Building blocks

Western cemetery . . . contains the graves of the workmen, who built the pyramids

The Pyramids

This Ancient Egyptian necropolis consists of the Pyramid of Khufu (known as the Great Pyramid and the Pyramid of Cheops), the somewhat smaller Pyramid of Khafre (or Chephren), retaining a prominent display of casing stones at its apex – a few hundred metres to the south-west, and the relatively modest-size Pyramid of Menkaure (or Mykerinus) a few hundred meters further south-west, along with a number of smaller satellite edifices, known as “queens” pyramids, causeways and valley pyramids. The Great Sphinx lies on the east side of the complex, facing east.


The Menkaure pyramid with the funerary temple (ruins)

View of the two pyramids – Khufu & Khafre’s

View of the Pyramids from the Giza Panorama

B&W . . . . . At the pyramids, 2008

Curios at the Giza Panorama (a raised area about 2 km away on the Giza Plateau from where you get the best view of all the three pyramids)

Camel rides for the visitors


The Great Sphinx of Giza

Surveying the sands of Giza, the great Sphinx has stood guard since about 2500 B.C. Created for Pharaoh Khafre, who also built the second pyramid at Giza, the Sphinx has the body of a lion and the face, it’s believed, of the pharaoh. It stands 66 feet (20 meters) high and was carved from limestone bedrock. Though it is badly eroded, the Great Sphinx has survived over 4,500 years of searing sun and political turmoil.

The Sphinx, guarding the Pyramid of Khafre

Another view of the Sphnix

The face of the Sphinx.

According to Asterix & Cleopatra, Obelix climbed on the nose of the sphinx and broke it.


The Sphinx
The pyramids from the Light & Sound Show Gallery


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3 thoughts on “Visit to the Pyramids

  1. hello. my name is aubree and im doing a research paper for school and wanted to ask you a few questions. It will kind of be like a web-interveiw. do you think you could help?

  2. thanks so much! i have about 15 questions. if thats ok.

    1. What do you thin is the most significant fact about the pyramids themselves?

    2. Technologically, how far ahead were the Egyptians and Mayans from the rest of civilization?

    3. How do you think they came up with all the different symbols that are inside the pyramids?

    4. Which civilization do you think was more advanced, the Egyptians or Mayans?

    5. What kind of advances did the Egyptians have than the rest of civilization?

    6. What kind of advances did the Mayans have than the rest of civilization?

    7. What happened to the Egyptians? Why do they not exist today?

    8. What happened to the Mayans? Why do they not exist today?

    9. Do you think there are more technological advances hidden in the lost Egyptian pyramids that we still haven’t discovered today?

    10. Do you think there are more technological advances hidden in the lost Mayan pyramids that we still haven’t discovered today?

    11. Were the Egyptian pyramids just used for story telling and king’s burials, or were they used for more?

    12. Were the Mayan pyramids just used for story telling and king’s burials, or were they used for more?

    13. Why did the Egyptians chose to write these symbols and stories on the walls of the pyramids rather than on paper or stone?

    14. Why did the Mayans chose to write these symbols and stories on the walls of the pyramids rather than on paper or stone?

    15. What is the most astounding thing you have learned while studying the pyramids?

    Again thank you!!

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